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REDIH - REDIH Mentors

 

Contact REDIH

Ms. Terri van Gulik
REDIH Coordinator
tvangulik@ohri.ca

 


Funded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research Institute of Human Development, Child and Youth Health

REDIH Mentors (eligible to supervise REDIH trainees)

Queen's University

Chandra Tayade, DVM, PhD
Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences
Queen's University
tayadec@queensu.ca
Graduate program: Anatomy and Cell Biology, Pathology and Molecular medicine

My research interests lie in interlinking mucosal, innate and adoptive immune responses to provide improved understanding of the molecular and cellular events at the maternal-fetal interface that control pregnancy success and failure. The unifying theme of my research program is to determine how neo-angiogenesis is regulated by endothelial and hematopoietic progenitor cells and to elucidate the mechanisms by which these cell types could be therapeutically manipulated in physiological processes like pregnancy and in pathological conditions such as endometriosis.

University of Toronto

Joel G. Ray, MD MSc
Departments of Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Health Policy Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto
University of Toronto
Profile
RayJ@smh.ca
Graduate program: Health Policy Management and Evaluation, and Institute of Medicial Sciences

Research in maternal and fetal and newborn health at a clinical and epidemiological level.

National Research Council, Ottawa

Lakshmi Krishnan, PhD
Group Leader, Adjuvants and Immunomodulation, Human Health Therapeutics portfolio, Division of Life Sciences, National Research Council, Ottawa, ON
Adjunct Professor, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa

Lakshmi.Krishnan@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca
Graduate program: Microbiology and Immunology

My laboratory focuses on basic and translational biomedical research in the area of feto-maternal immunology. Pregnancy confers a unique, albeit transient immune status to the maternal host and some infections are exacerbated during pregnancy. Intracellular pathogens such as Listeria and Salmonella have evolved to survive and replicate within the placenta (trophoblast). My lab addresses the differential immune responsiveness of the placenta to such infections, relative to other immune cells such as macrophages. The objective is to understand the molecular mechanisms of placental infection and the manner in which this affects pathogen survival, maternal infection, transplacental infection, pre-mature birth, fetal growth restriction or fetal loss. The mechanisms of placental death triggered by specific infections are also studied. Murine feto-placental infection models and in-vitro placental culture models are utilized. Technical training for trainees is imparted in murine-feto-placental infection models, cellular immunology, flow cytometry and placental histology. Our long-term goal is to devise novel strategies to protect pregnant women and the fetus against the harmful effects of infection.

Health Canada

Michael Wade, PhD
Environmental Health Science & Research Bureau
Health Canada
Mike.Wade@hc-sc.gc.ca

My laboratory studies the molecular basis by which substances impair hormonal control of tissue differentiation with the aim of improving safety assessment. Current research projects include studying the impacts of commercial chemicals on thyroid hormone physiology, on hormonal control of fat cell precursor differentiation, and on sex steroid action. These studies are examining the effects of bisphenol A, triclosan, brominated flame retardants, phthalate esters and other commercial chemicals.
Carole Yauk, PhD
Research Scientist, Health Canada
Adjunct Professor, Dept. of Biology, Carleton University
http://www.cnslab.carleton.ca/~ilambert/research/carole_yauk.htm
carole_yauk@hc-sc.gc.ca
Graduate program: Biology, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Research in our laboratory investigates toxicogenomics and genetic toxicology, with a focus on the response of the genome and epigenome to environmental chemicals. Recent projects include the effects of air pollution on sperm during development and in adulthood, and potential dietary mediators of genetic toxicity, on heritable and transgenerational effects.
Francesco Marchetti, DSc
Research Scientist, Environmental Health Science & Research Bureau
Health Canada
Francesco.marchetti@hc-sc.gc.ca

My laboratory studies the effects of environmental exposures of the genetic integrity of germ cells, the transmission of DNA damage to the offspring and the consequences for proper embryonic development. Current research projects include the use of transgenic mice to study and contrast the induction of mutations in somatic tissues versus germ cells, DNA repair processes during gametogenesis and early embryogenesis, and genetic and environmental factors that affect germ cell aneuploidy.

McGill University

Jacquetta Trasler, MD,PhD
Departments of Pediatrics, Human Genetics and Pharmacology & Therapeutics
McGill University
Montreal Children's Hospital of the McGill University Hospital Centre Research Institute
http://muhc.ca/research/researcher/jacquetta-trasler-md-phd
jacquetta.trasler@mcgill.ca
Graduate programs:
Department of Human Genetics
Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics

The overall goal of Dr. Trasler's research is to better understand normal and abnormal mammalian development. More specifically, we are using molecular and cell biology techniques to study the epigenome (in particular DNA methylation) and how gene expression is regulated in developing germ cells and embryos and the implications for the resulting offspring. We are testing how alterations in the epigenome (e.g. via alterations in folate pathway enzymes or dietary folate, techniques used in assisted reproduction, aging, and gene deficiencies), during the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation patterns in the germline and early embryo, affect fertilization and health of the offspring. A second interest is to determine the molecular and cellular targets for drug effects on developing male germ cells. In collaboration with other investigators, we are developing methods to monitor and prevent drug damage to the germ cells of patients treated for infertility and with anticancer drugs.
Hugh Clarke, PhD
Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Biology, and Medicine, McGill University
Research Institute
McGill University Health Centre
http://www.medicine.mcgill.ca/csr-cer/members_template_hclarke.htm
hugh.clarke@mcgill.ca
Graduate program: Biology, Experimental Medicine

Research in the Clarke lab focuses on oogenesis; in particular, how this process produces eggs that are able to develop as embryos following fertilization. Specific areas of interest are how maternal mRNA is stored in the oocyte, translationally activated at the appropriate time, and subsequently degraded, and the nature and function of granulosa cell-oocyte interactions during oocyte development.
Daniel Dufort, PhD
Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Biology and the Division of Experimental Medicine
McGill University
http://www.medicine.mcgill.ca/csr-cer/members_template_ddufort.htm
daniel.dufort@mcgill.ca
Graduate programs:
Experimental Medicine: http://www.medicine.mcgill.ca/expmed/gradstudies.htm
Developmental Biology: http://biology.mcgill.ca/grad/developmental/index.html

The research interests in the Dufort lab is in elucidating the embryo-uterine communication that is required for successful for successful implantation. We are using, molecular, embryological and well as genetic approaches to identify the signaling pathways and their roles in the implantation process. Furthermore, we are also interested in elucidating the role of maternal signals in proper development and function of the placenta which are often associated with complications during pregnancy such as Preeclampsia and Preterm Birth.
Barbara Hales, PhD
McGill University, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics
http://www.medicine.mcgill.ca/pharma/haleslab/default.htm
barbara.hales@mcgill.ca
Graduate program: Pharmacology and Therapeutics program

Dr. Hales' research interests focus on mechanisms of action of drugs as teratogens. She studies developmental toxicity using a combination of in vivo, in vitro, and molecular approaches with the goal of elucidating how the embryo responds to insult after direct or maternal exposure and the consequences to progeny of paternal drug exposure.
Bernard Robaire, PhD
McGill University, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics
http://www.medicine.mcgill.ca/pharma/robairelab/
bernard.robaire@mcgill.ca
Graduate program: Pharmacology and Therapeutics Graduate program

Dr Robaire's research interests focus on androgen action, the structure, function and regulation of the epididymis, aging of the male reproductive system, reproductive toxicology, and how do drugs used to treat cancer affect the reproductive function of males, their progeny and their state of mind related to reproduction.

McMaster University

Warren Foster, PhD
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University
http://fhs.mcmaster.ca/medsci/faculty/fosterw.html
foster@mcmaster.ca
Graduate program: Medical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University

Basic biomedical research in ovarian regulation, endometriosis, and reproductive toxicology. The primary research interest of my laboratory focuses on the mechanisms regulating inappropriate estrogen production and metabolism in estrogen dependent target tissues and diseases such as breast cancer and endometriosis. Isolated ovarian follicle culture techniques are employed to evaluate the effect of environmental contaminants and lifestyle factors on follicle growth, steroidogenesis, tissue remodeling enzymes, apoptosis and autophagy. Toxicant- induced changes in resistance to apoptosis and cell invasion are also studied.
Sarah McDonald, BA, MD, FRCSC, MSc
Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine
Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Radiology, and Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, McMaster University
http://www.fhs.mcmaster.ca/obgyn/faculty_member_mcdonald.htm
mcdonals@mcmaster.ca
Graduate program: Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Research in women's and perinatal health using clinical epidemiology. Interested in programming effects through IVF as well as other perinatal events such as maternal obesity and excess weight gain. Current focus is explaining and predicting both infant and maternal outcomes with an eye towards developing prevention strategies.
Alison Holloway, PhD
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University

http://fhs.mcmaster.ca/medsci/faculty/holloway.html
hollow@mcmaster.ca
Graduate program: Medical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University

Basic biomedical research in fetal origins of adult disease. The main focus of my research is to examine how exposure to fetal exposure to chemical insults (encountered through lifestyle choices, inadvertent exposure to man-made chemicals and dietary sources) results in adverse postnatal health outcomes in the offspring including type 2 diabetes, obesity, hypertension and infertility.

Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa

Jay Baltz, PhD
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology, and Cellular & Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa
http://www.ohri.ca/profiles/baltz.asp
jmbaltz@ohri.ca
Graduate program: Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa

Basic biomedical research in oocyte development and early embryo development, with particular interest in cell volume regulation, the role of follicular cells in supporting oocyte growth, biological transport and transport proteins, and the biochemical processes in early embryos that are needed for the subsequent healthy development of the fetus, placenta and offspring.
William Gibb, PhD
Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology, and Cellular & Molecular Medicine,
Medicine, University of Ottawa
http://www.medecine.uottawa.ca/obstetricsgynecology/eng/bio_william_gibb.html
wgibb@ottawahospital.on.ca
Graduate program: Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa

With Dr S. G. Matthews, Department of Physiology, University of Toronto we are investigating the physiological role during pregnancy of two ABC transporters. The placenta and fetal brain have been shown to express the multidrug resistant gene product 1 (Mdr-1) also known as P- glycoprotein (P-gp) and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP). These proteins are potentially capable of protecting the fetus from a large number of drugs and toxins and regulating tissue access by certain hormones and therapeutics. In vitro and in vivo studies in human placenta and the mouse are being carried out to define the expression and regulation of Mdr-1/P-gp and BCRP during pregnancy and their role in fetal protection and development.
Andrée Gruslin, MD
Division Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Depts. of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Cellular and Molecular Medicine
University of Ottawa, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
http://www.ohri.ca/profiles/gruslin.asp
agruslin@ottawahospital.on.ca
Graduate program: Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa

Basic and clinical research in feto-placental development. Emphasis on molecular regulation of placental growth in particular through IGF system. Translational nature of basic research allows applications for clinical studies in which the focus is prediction and prevention of placental diseases, namely preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction.
Arthur Leader, MD (associated)
http://www.conceive.ca
Marie-Claude Léveillé, PhD
Ottawa Fertility Centre and Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of Ottawa
http://www.conceive.ca/aboutus/index.php?lang=en&link=ScientificDirector
mleveille@conceive.ca

Clinical research in the optimization of Human Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART). This research is done in collaboration with our basic science research colleagues. The aim of these studies is to identify markers for technology improvement in the clinical laboratory and advancement in ovarian stimulation protocols. Another aspect of our research is the safety of emerging or current ART technologies whether by using an animal model to validate new clinical protocols or by using our clinical database to assess the safety of our interventions.
Johné Liu, PhD
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology, and Biochemistry, Microbiology & Immunology (BMI), University of Ottawa
http://www.ohri.ca/profiles/liu.asp
jliu@ohri.ca
Graduate program: Biochemistry, and Human and Molecular Genetics (HMG), University of Ottawa

Basic biomedical research in oocyte maturation, birth defects and cancers. There are two main research foci. The first deals with cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate cytokinesis during polar body emission, employing confocal imaging of live cells as the main experimental approach. The second focuses on biological and environmental factors contributing to egg aneuploidy and birth defects, particularly of women of advanced reproductive age (>35 years).
Nuch Tanphaichitr, PhD
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology, and Cellular & Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa
http://www.ohri.ca/profiles/tanpha.asp
ntanphaichitr@ohri.ca
Graduate program: Biochemistry, University of Ottawa

For the past two decades, our research studies have geared towards the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of sperm-egg interaction. Our target molecules are sulfoglycolipid (SGG) and its binding proteins-including cationic antimicrobial peptides, present on the sperm surface. The ultimate goal is to have our basic science results translated into development of non-hormonal contraceptives and biomarkers of gamete fertilizing ability. We want these non-hormonal contraceptives, such as soluble analogs of SGG and LL-37 antimicrobial peptide, to concurrently act against the infection of pathogenic microbes and viruses in the vagina. This has led to our second line of research on HIV-1 transmission through the vaginal/cervical mucosa, and the roles of glycolipids on the surface of the female reproductive tract in this viral transmission.
Benjamin Tsang, PhD
Chronic Disease Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Cellular & Molecular Medicine
University of Ottawa
http://www.ohri.ca/profiles/tsang.asp
btsang@ohri.ca
Graduate program: Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa

Basic and translational research in ovarian follicular development and atresia, with particular interest in their endocrine (gonadotropins, adipokines and thyroid hormone), paracrine and autocrine (growth factors and cytokines) control, metabolic-reproductive interactions, gene regulation, cell signaling, and pathobiology of polycystic ovarian syndrome and gonadotropin poor responsiveness.
Barbara Vanderhyden, PhD
Departments of Cellular & Molecular Medicine, and Obstetrics & Gynecology
University of Ottawa

Centre for Cancer Therapeutics, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
http://www.med.uottawa.ca/vanderhyden/
bvanderhyden@ohri.ca
Graduate program: Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa

Research in the Vanderhyden lab focuses on paracrine signals the regulate oocyte-granulosa cell interactions and foster healthy follicle development in the mouse ovary. Using culture systems, molecular biology and genetically modified mice as models of infertility and ovarian cancer, we are also investigating how certain reproductive factors alter risk for ovarian cancer.
Mark Walker, MD
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine)
Cross-appointed to the Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine
University of Ottawa
http://www.ohri.ca/profiles/mark_walker.asp
mwalker@ohri.ca

Dr. Mark Walker is a high risk obstetrician and Clinical Epidemiologist at the University of Ottawa. He has been continuously funded by the CIHR for the last 10 years. He has been successful in grant funding from Canadian Foundation for Innovation, Heart and Stroke Foundation, as well as the Physicians' Services Inc. He has published over 160 peer reviewed articles and has made a significant impact in our understanding of folic acid in pregnancy, thrombophilia in pregnancy, and is a highly regarded perinatal health services researcher. Dr. Walker's leadership roles include the Chair of the Society of Investigators in Obstetrics and Gynecology, the co-Chair of the Provincial Council for Maternal Newborn Health, the scientific Director and co-director of BORN (Better Outcomes Registry and Network) and the co-chair of the Canadian Perinatal Surveillance System's Maternal Infant Study Group. He currently holds a Tier 1 Chair from the University of Ottawa in Perinatal Research. He is co-founder of the OMNI Research Group (Obstetrics, Maternal and Newborn Investigations) at the Ottawa Hospital which is the largest maternal and newborn research group in Canada and ranks in the top 5 in the world.
Shi-Wu Wen, PhD
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology and of Epidemiology and Community Medicine
University of Ottawa
http://www.ohri.ca/profiles/wen.asp
swwen@ohri.ca
Graduate program: Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa

Dr. Shi Wu Wen is a perinatal epidemiologist. Dr. Wen has obtained, together with Dr. Mark Walker, a Canadian Foundation for Innovation "New Opportunities" grant to establish a research infrastructure in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. They have created a nationally recognized group in perinatal epidemiology, OMNI (Obstetrics and Maternal Newborn Investigations). They are one of the main themes of research in the clinical epidemiology program. Supported by operating grants from CIHR, PSI and Sick Kids Foundation, Dr. Wen's current research focuses on the health effects of folic acid and prescription drugs in pregnancy. The training will be realized through supervised research projects for graduate students and post- MD or post-PhD fellows in perinatal health. For each trainee, we will develop an individualized, focused research project within the large-scale study.

Université Laval

François Richard, PhD
Centre de recherche en biologie de la reproduction, Département des sciences animales,
Université Laval
http://www.crbr.ulaval.ca/equipe-crbr.html?&L=1
francois.richard@fsaa.ulaval.ca
Graduate program: Animal Science, Université Laval

The Richard lab studies oocyte meiotic maturation, phosphodiesterase involvement in oocyte maturation, cellular compartmentation studying lipid raft clustering, gap junction communication between cumulus cells during in vitro maturation and oocyte developmental competence.
Claude Robert, PhD
Département des sciences animales, Centre de recherche en biologie de la reproduction, Institut des nutraceutiques et des aliments fonctionnels (INAF),
Université Laval
http://www.crbr.ulaval.ca
http://www.inaf.ulaval.ca/

claude.robert@fsaa.ulaval.ca

My research program focuses around the study of early embryogenesis and the impact of the embryonic micro-environment. We are mainly using the bovine model as the developmental kinetics during the first week of life are similar to Human including a long pre-embryonic genome activation period. We have been involved in studying the impacts of in vitro embryo production and of oocyte origins through a comparative gene expression approach and more recently by profiling DNA methylation in these embryos. I am currently invested in studying the roles of long non-coding RNAs during early embryogenesis. We found a large contingent of these RNA molecules in various developmental stages and we observed that their abundance largely fluctuates in response to environmental conditions. We still do not know if these fluctuations are reflecting discrepancies in the establishment of the epigenome. This aspect is currently part of the ongoing work.
Marc-André Sirard, DVM, PhD
Centre de recherche en biologie de la reproduction
Canadian Research Chair in reproduction and genomics
Département des sciences animales,
Université Laval, Québec
http://www.crbr.ulaval.ca/equipe-crbr.html?&L=1
Marc-Andre.Sirard@fsaa.ulaval.ca
Graduate program: Animal Science, Université Laval

Basic and applied research in oocyte development and early embryo development, with particular interest the acquisition of developmental competence, the role of follicular cells in supporting such competence. The oocyte is a unique cell and still contains several mysteries such as the capacity to reprogram any adult cell.

Université de Montréal

Bruce Murphy, BSc, MSc, PhD
Centre de recherche en reproduction animale
Faculté de médecine vétérinaire, Université de Montréal
http://www.medvet.umontreal.ca/crra/
http://www.rqr.umontreal.ca/
bruce.d.murphy@umontreal.ca
Graduate program: MSc and PhD programs in reproduction through the Faculté de médecine vétérinaire.

Studies of ovarian function, funded by a CIHR operating grant are focused on the role of nuclear receptors as regulators of preovulatory follicle development, ovulation and luteinization. Tissue specific gene deletion is employed along with molecular methods. A second major interest is the phenomenon of embryonic diapause, or delayed implantation, whereby there is a reversible arrest in development at the blastocyst stage. This work is funded by an NSERC operating grant. Uterine and embryonic gene expression during diapause and following reactivation of the embryo are under investigation.
Puttaswamy Manjunath, PhD
Departments of Medicine and Biochemistry, and Program in Biomedical Sciences
University of Montreal
Centre de recherche Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont


http://www.biochimie.umontreal.ca/bottin411/Enseignants/manjunath_p.html
Profile
puttaswamy.manjunath@umontreal.ca
Graduate program:MSc and PhD programs in Biochemistry or Biomedical Sciences

Dr. Manjunath's research is focused on two aspects of reproductive biology. The first goal is to understand the biochemical and physiological mechanisms involved in fertilization. His group has discovered a protein unique to the male reproductive tract. This protein is believed to be involved in fertility and hence could be used as fertility marker. These studies are also aimed at diagnosis and treatment of infertility and development of male contraceptive. The second research program is focused on understanding the mechanisms of sperm protection during storage in egg yolk and milk extenders (sperm dilution medium) with an overall objective to develop globally competitive and environmentally-friendly novel extenders with domestic and international potentials. His group has developed a pathogen-free synthetic extender (patented), which is currently being tested for commercial use.
Lawrence Smith, DVM,PhD
Centre de recherche en reproduction animale
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine
Univesity of Montreal
http://www.medvet.umontreal.ca/crra/index.php/chercheurs/lawrence-c-smith
smithl@medvet.umontreal.ca
Graduate program: MSc and PhD in Veterinary Sciences
http://www.etudes.umontreal.ca/index_fiche_prog/358110_desc.html

Basic and applied veterinary biomedical research in early embryonic development, with particular interest in the nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions regulating the epigenetic reprogramming of imprinted genes, and the health risks of using artificial reproductive techonologies such as in vitro embryo culture, somatic cell nuclear transfer and pluripotent stem cell derivation in laboratory and domestic animal models.
Christopher Price, PhD
Centre de recherche en reproduction animale
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine
Univesity of Montreal
http://www.rqr.umontreal.ca/index.php/en/members/christopher-a-price
christopher.price@umontreal.ca
Graduate program: MSc and PhD in Veterinary Sciences, reproduction option

The lab focus is the health and atresia of follicular cells, with an emphasis on granulosa cells. The cow is the model used for primarily in-vitro studies on differentiation and apoptosis of granulosa cells, and on the periovulatory cascade. We are currently interested in the roles of fibroblast growth factors (FGF), and are using mircoarray approaches to unravel divergent signaling of members of the FGF superfamily.

University of Ottawa

Colla Macdonald, EdD
Full Professor, University of Ottawa
Faculty of Education Cross Appointed with Faculty of Medicine
http://www.education.uottawa.ca/en/faculty/professors?p=cmacdonald
cjmacdon@uottawa.ca
Graduate program: Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Dr. MacDonald's research concentrates on curriculum design and program evaluation, eLearners and eLearning environments. Her Canadian Foundation for Innovation funded laboratory facilitates seven PhD students who work on projects related to curriculum design, program evaluation, flexible delivery and transformative pedagogies, and various aspects of emerging technologies such as simulators, avatars, artificial intelligence, and digital storytelling.
Shannon Bainbridge, PhD
Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences,
University of Ottawa
http://www.health.uottawa.ca/healthsciences/staff/sbainbridge.htm
shannon.bainbridge@uottawa.ca
Graduate program: Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, Cellular and MolecularMedicine (pending), University of Ottawa

Basic biomedical research in feto-placental development and physiology. A primary focus of our research program is the identification of molecular subclasses of preeclampsia that correspond to unique placental pathologies, with an ultimate goal of identifying subclass-specific biomarkers that can be used to identify preeclamptic women with different underlying placental pathophysiology early in gestation. These research objectives will bridge the disciplines of basic science research, bioinformatics and medicine, allowing for the potential prevention and treatment of preeclampsia using an individualized medicine approach.

University of Western Ontario

Gerald Kidder, PhD
Departments of Physiology & Pharmacology, Obstetrics & Gynaecology, and Paediatrics
The University of Western Ontario
http://www.uwo.ca/physpharm/faculty/kidder_gerald.html
gerald.kidder@schulich.uwo.ca
Graduate program: Physiology, University of Western Ontario

The Kidder lab studies genetically modified mice as models of human infertility and congenital abnormalities. We are especially interested in pathways of intercellular communication, involving both gap junctions and paracrine factors, which govern gametogenesis and embryogenesis to ensure the development of healthy embryos.
Mellissa Mann, PhD
Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology, and Biochemistry
University of Western Ontario Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry Scientist, Children's Health Research Institute
http://publish.uwo.ca/~mmann22
mmann22@uwo.ca
Graduate program: Biochemisty, University of Western Ontario

Dr. Mann's lab focuses on epigenetic mechanisms that control gene expression, specifically on genomic imprinting. Basic science research is conducted in an mouse model system to elucidate the biological mechanisms regulating genomic imprinting in eggs and embryos, and to determine how ART leads to their dysregulation. More specifically, the goal of research is to determine the effects of hormone treatment administered to mothers on imprint acquisition in oocytes and imprint maintenance in their embryos; to determine the effects of cryopreservation of oocytes and embryos on genomic imprinting; and to determine the effects of embryo culture on genomic imprinting and early development
Jeffrey Nisker, MD, PhD, FRCSC, FCAHS
Departments of Obstetrics-Gynecology and Oncology
Coordinator Health Ethics and Humanities
Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry
The University of Western Ontario
http://publish.uwo.ca/~jnisker/
jeff.nisker@lhsc.on.ca
Graduate program: The Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology,
Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry and the Faculty of Health Sciences (Health Professional Education Field),
The University of Western Ontario

Our research program focuses on (i) meanings and understandings of genetic terms among public, patients, health professionals, research participants and researchers regarding prenatal genetic screening, and children and adults with potential genetic conditions; (ii) the effect of epigenetic and other factors related to the effect toxic chemicals on the embryo, fetus, and human reproduction.
Francis Tekpetey, PhD (associated)
Andrew Watson, PhD
Children's Health Research Institute
Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology & Physiology and Pharmacology
The University of Western Ontario
http://www.chri.org/db/watson.htm
awatson@uwo.ca
Graduate program: Physiology and Pharmacology, The University of Western Ontario

Our research is focused on understanding the earliest stages of development which includes the period from fertilization to implantation to the uterus and the beginnings of pregnancy. All of our studies use an animal model to investigate this early period of development. Our results from animal studies can be translated to the human and help clinicians develop better ways of helping couples with fertility problems conceive and have their families. Research has demonstrated that the very beginnings of development have a major impact on not only whether pregnancy will occur but also on the health of the fetus, newborn, child and even on susceptibility to disease in advanced life. Thus it is important to ensure that safe and efficient methods are applied in the clinic to ensure that the assistance provided to couples with fertility challenges not only allows them to start their family but also ensures that their family will enjoy the best health possible throughout their lifetime.
Kaiping Yang, PhD
Children's Health Research Institute & Lawson Health Research Institute
Departments of Obstetrics & Gynaecology and Physiology & Pharmacology
The University of Western Ontario
http://www.chri.org/fnbh/yang.htm
kyang@uwo.ca
Graduate program: Physiology & Pharmacology,, The University of Western Ontario

The Yang lab investigates molecular mechanisms of fetal growth restriction and fetal programming of central obesity using both in vitro cell model systems and in vivo animal models. Specifically, we examine the role and regulation of placental glucocorticoid barrier (i.e., 11ß-HSD2) in normal and abnormal fetal development. We also seek to link environmental factors (e.g., cadmium exposure, smoking, and caffeine consumption) to altered placental 11ß-HSD2 function/expression and fetal growth restriction. In addition, we pursue the adipose tissue hypothesis that an adverse intrauterine environment permanently programs adipose tissue structure and function leading to the development of central obesity later in life.